Winslow Tudor
November 1, 2012

By this time of year the garden has been weeded for the last time, cleared of dried stems and brown leaves, and compost spread upon the beds. The ground will soon be frozen, and the long shadows that shield the frost on the grass for much of the day, arrive late and depart early. In between it is dark, for winter is here.

Winslow Tudor
August 31, 2012
Beyond the grape arbor and to the south of the greenhouse resides Tasha’s hollyhock bank. Its proximity to the herb circle subtly unites it with the rest of the garden, but by late July when much of the color in the garden has faded it is the focal point, for the hollyhocks are in full bloom. Ranging from pure white to varying shades of pink and yellow, the hollyhocks are a wonderful presence, particularly very late in the afternoon when the sun sets beyond the field and for a moment casts its light across the entire garden.

Natalie Wise
April 12, 2012

It is springtime in Vermont, and that is marked with many subtle and not-so-subtle shifts in routine. Four o'clock is no longer dusk, and as such, our tea times feel lighter, and more refreshing...compelling us onward into the now-light evening. Tea has taken on a distinctly spring-like feel, filled with pastel chocolates, citrusy delights, and a table laden with fresh flowers. As if a riot of daffodils in Tasha's garden, and the perfectly clear blue skies aren't lovely enough, Easter and April birthdays make the time seem even more exciting. Here are few recent scenes...

Winslow Tudor
March 2, 2012

Though the snow is on the ground spring is near. The trees are budding against the full moon, and the days are longer. Yet spring in the hills of New England is relative. It is near, only in that it may be seen from afar, rather than not at all.

Natalie Wise
November 23, 2011

Dear Friends,
 

Winslow spent the end of summer and the beginning of fall adding new cedar shingles to his grandmother's house, a job that has taken him through summer's high ferns to autumn's bright foliage...and will continue for much longer as he makes his way around the whole house. 

Winslow Tudor
September 2, 2011

On either side of the road leading to Tasha’s house the asters are in bloom. They are the wild, New England variety, and though they are fond of roadsides, their largest colony thrives at the end of the vegetable garden. Phlox, goldenrod, Joe Pye Weed and a few hardy annuals flourish in the terraces in front of the house, while along the borders of the field the hardwoods are rapidly turning color. 

Winslow Tudor
June 16, 2011

A short distance beyond the stone terrace in front of Tasha’s house where the land tilts south and the jewelweed and nettle possess the ground between lawn and woods, a population of creatures surprising in variety has taken up residence. A doe and her fawn wait out the heat of the day in the shade where the moss grows, along with several porcupines. The porcupines make their appearance at dusk, generally near the crown of the pear trees where the leaves are especially to their liking, or else in the raspberry patch where this year’s canes are on the menu. It is harder to keep porcupines out of a garden than deer.   

Natalie Wise
June 9, 2011

Tuesday brought our first official afternoon tea (lemonade) on Granny's porch! We were all so excited! This tradition is full of happy memories, and this occasion was no exception. Marjorie brought out our favorite picnic basket and juiced all of the lemons, Amy and Ellie picked some mint, and Seth carried the basket of goodies through the garden to the porch.

Winslow Tudor
February 12, 2011

As January turns into February and the days become longer, Valentines Day approaches. Cards of an affectionate nature arrive in the mail or appear on the table, perhaps merely a prelude to the flowers and confections to follow.

Winslow Tudor
December 25, 2010

Over the years the clapboards and shingles on Tasha’s house have darkened from sunlight, rain and time. Winter brings a moment of rest and peace to the land, gardens and house as it sits in the quiet landscape. Christmas is here, as is a cardinal not indifferent to the sunflower seeds scattered around the back step and under the lilacs. Balsam needles and melting snow from the newly set up tree have been swept from the floor, along with bits of paper left over from wrapping presents now under the tree. Indoors everything is alight in reds, greens and gold.