handmade

  • Doll Size Flatware Tray

    Tasha did not keep good silverware in her tray; rather it held kitchen utensils of various sorts. Doll sized quarter reproduction of Tasha's own flatware tray. Length 3.5'' Depth 2 5/8'' Height 1.5''

  • Making Valentine Mobiles

    February 2, 2017

    One of the most exciting things about February 14th is making and exchanging paper valentines. A Valentine Mobile makes a creative and unique substitution for a card, and also serves as a re-usable decoration for February 14th. 

    In the wonderful book Tasha Tudor's Old-Fashioned Gifts, Tasha Tudor and Linda Allen include instructions for making Valentine Mobiles and today we are going to show you how to make our own, somewhat simplified, version!

  • Marjorie Tudor: Cut Wool Rabbit, Upright, Large

    Marjorie has artistically mastered this old-fashioned English craft, taught to her by her Mother-in-Law, Tasha Tudor.

  • Mole Hollow Beeswax Candles

    Since the Tudor Family handmade candles are produced in small quantities and sell out so quickly, we have another option for you.  Mole Hollow is a family owned and operated business located in Sturbridge, Massachusetts. Their candles are entirely handmade by craftspeople using premium materials and the same methods that have been in place since the company’s founding in 1969. They maintain a commitment to artisanal manufacturing methods that lends a quality to their candles that cannot be found anywhere else.

    7/8" diameter taper candles (roughly the diameter of a nickel.) Pure USA origin Beeswax. 8"length.

  • Painting Easter Eggs

    April 11, 2017

    Tasha Tudor went out of her way to make every day full of beauty and magic. This was especially true on holidays. Whether for Christmas, Valentines Day, or birthdays, Tasha and her family spent many hours preparing decorations, gifts, and delectable treats to mark the occasion. 

    Easter was the main event of Spring, perhaps second only to Christmas when it came to preparing elaborate decorations! Her son, Seth Tudor, remembers the sometimes harrowing tasks he and his siblings were given in the lead-up to Easter, “We would take brown or white chicken eggs (occasionally the larger duck and goose eggs), puncture a small hole in either end, and using mouth pressure, force out the contents--neither an easy nor enjoyable task.”